SCIENTISTS TURNED THE OCEAN INTO A CONTROLLED LABORATORY

CONTROLLING THE ACIDITY IN WHICH A REEF EXISTENCE GIVES US THE WINDOW STRAIGHT INTO THE ACTUAL EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE.

As marine scientist David Kline, of Australia’s University of Queensland, head out for Heron Island in the Great Barrier Reef, he together with his group were decided to help resolve a pressing issue: How will increasing acidity due to climate change harm coral reefs?

So they introduced along their Coral Proto FOCE, the very first device that enables experts manipulate acidity in the reef’s natural environment. (The FOCE technology originated at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute in Moss Landing, California.)

The Coral Proto is a certain three-foot-long plastic-type container with sliding doors. After placing it in a reef, scientists choose a pH on a system. A pump consequently squirts pre-acidified ocean water coming from an onshore tank inside the box. The Proto’s acidity detectors trace levels to sustain the ideal pH. When it is time to assess on how

When it is time to assess on how reef is faring, the scientists move down the Proto’s doors in order to formulate a covered chamber. They may then test the water inside it for oxygen (a marker of photosynthesis) and alkalinity (a marker of coral growth).